Educed Play, Collaborative Performance, 2012


“Educed Play,” collaboration between MFA students in the School of Art and the School of Dance investigates spontaneity and the invisible communication that can exist in improvisation and collaborative play.


Collaborators presented a series of cumulative performances based on improvisation between their mediums. Collaborators included dancer, Amanda Ling; musician Caio Vissicaro; dancer/videographer Inkyung Lee; and artist Rossitza Todorova. A year of rehearsals led to eight performances held during a weeklong exhibition at the Step Gallery located at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, November 5 - 9, 2012.

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Educed Play review by Brian Ganter

“Educed Play is a study of improvisation and unspoken communication. The four collaborators use music, drawing, video, and dance to create passionate solos, duets, and quartets. Using progressively darker shades of India ink, the performers draw, spray, and jab at white butcher paper covered walls and floor. Two boat-like paper elements were hung by strings that traversed the gallery space. The performers pulled the paper boats across the space, sometimes playing games on ‘the deck,’ and other times enacting sensual duets. Ethereal auditory tones filled the small gallery space, only to be broken by the harsh crumple of paper. Providing yet another layer to the performance were two handheld video cameras attached to separate televisions. Used mainly by Inkyung, the video allowed the audience to see the performance from the videographer’s point of view.

The final set of scores are tight, dynamic, and emotionally filled. Each performance, while scored similarly, had completely different energies and emotions. My two favorite scores came at the very end. The second to last performance was chaotic and destructive. The performers had a spirited energy behind each body movement as they tore their precious space apart. It was the last performance of the night (and of the entire series) that left the greatest lasting impression on me. As one of only a handful of audience members, the final score was very intimate and unique. One could tell that Amanda, Inkyund, Rossi, and Caio performed their final score not for the audience, but for themselves. It was poignant, melancholic, and familial. Each movement was thoughtful and slow – they didn’t want it to end. Fittingly, one of the suspended boats fell, thereby providing yet another avenue for improvisation. With their final moments, the four performers huddled inside a protective cocoon made out of the fallen boat. And when they had stopped moving inside, the entire gallery space went quiet. Tired and with a little sadness, the performers emerged from their warm, enveloping home.” 

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